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that gave birth to the country's revolution less than two years ago, this sends president mohamed morsi a message, what freedom fighters say must happen to stop a new cycle of violence in the streets. fox reports live from cairo. also, destruction, more than 40 buildings taking a hit, in an explosion, some leveled, new tonight, neighbors bringing us inside the horror with stories you will never forget. >> you were startled and then heard screaming and everyone in the buildings are screaming. >> windows are shattered and the window frame is down on the floor. >> harris: the search for answers intensifying as we learn more about split-second decisions that saved lives. >>> and his character left hundreds of millions of viewers asking, who shot jr. remembering larry hagman, the man who played the villain, the world couldn't help loving. i'm harris faulkener well, begin with egypt on edge and turmoil and violence spreading and response to a colossal power grab. by egypt's islamist president, mohamed morsi. though country's rocky transition to democracy may hit a brick wall, two days of viol
had gathered in cairo's tahrir square calling for the ouster of president mohamed morsy. opposition leaders say new powers grabbed by morsy make him look like a dictator. reza sayah has more on the massive protests. >> reporter: outrage, clashes and anguish in tahrir. thousands of angry egyptians back in a public square that has become the arab world's emblem for the democratic right to protest. this was where egyptians demanded the ouster of former president hosni mubarak last year. this time the fury aimed at current president mohamed morsy. >> we're here because we don't want morsy to rule us anymore. >> a one-man show. he wants to do everything. nothing at all of what we want, you know? >> reporter: on thursday, the new president made himself the most powerful man in egypt by announcing sweeping decrees he says will designed to push forward the drafting of egypt's new constitution and speed up the formation of a government that's still missing a parliament. >> one of his decrees bans anyone from overturning any of his declarations since he took over office in june. that order is
in jerusalem. stephanie, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. even egyptian president mohammed morsi hinted there was a deal. but late today, a spokesperson for hamas, said there would be no cease-fire, at least not tonight. making secretary clinton's job here on the ground even more difficult. secretary of state clinton cut her trip to asia short, diverting to israel to personally help shepherd a possible cease-fire. >> the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> reporter: making her task more difficult, the u.s. has no diplomatic relationship with hamas. a group it labels a terrorist organization. so egyptian president mohammed morsi is playing a key role as intermediary. >> the critical challenge is going to be to make sure that everybody understands the commitments that have been made, the same way, so there's no misunderstandings. >> reporter: even with diplomacy in high gear, today was one of the st violence days yet. an israeli soldier was killed. the first since
president of egypt, mohamed morsi. the question now, is will it hold? will the people of the region get some peace? we have more on both sides of the conflict. we get more from our chief correspondent andrea mitchell, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, kate, the cease-fire was brokered under pressure from president obama, but wouldn't have happened without egypt's new islamic president, mohamed morsi, playing a key role. the cease-fire came after another night of punishing air strikes against gaza. and the first bus bombing in tel aviv in eight years. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today for a cease-fire in gaza, the rocket attacks must end to bring a broader, calm return. >> reporter: the agreement calls for israel to stop air strikes and hamas to stop rocket attacks. if that holds for 24 hours, they will talk about border contrs on gaza, and promise no more targeting of hamas leaders. israeli ground troops are mobilized, if there are attacks >> now, i realize that there are citizens who expect a harder military action, and we may very well need to do that. but at the pre
mohamed morsi's decision to grant himself sweeping new powers. we have a live report from cairo with the latest. iman, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. thousands are pouring into the square angered by the decree. let's talk about the protests taking place. close to tahrir square is the u.s. embassy. today riot police outside the embassy compound fired teargas, pelted protesters with rocks to try to keep them back. the protesters also exchanged throwing stones at the riot police. that incident brings back serious concerns for u.s. officials because several months ago, back on september 11th a similar scene erupted outside the u.s. embassy. there's growing concern about the security force ts and their ability to maintain law and order. we've seen clashes erupt, many of them towards the freedom of justice party. that is the political wing of the muslim brotherhood from which president mohamed morsi comes from. we're talking about the decree that he issued on thursday that gave him sweeping powers to make new laws without judicial reviews, that has angered many and what has
president mohammed morsi is meeting with the country's top judges to explain the extraordinary powers that he granted himself on thursday. among the decrees, judges cannot overturn any decision he makes or a law he imposes until a new constitution is finalized. mr. morsi extended the time to write the new constitution and he dismissed the country's attorney general. reza sayah is overlooking everything in tahrir square. most of us were thinking that mohammed morsi really very much the peacemaker, key to the cease-fire between israel and hamas. doesn't even settle with the truce and then morsi announces this decree essentially a huge power grab. what is the significance? >> reporter: well, suzanne, the significance is until a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constitution is drafted, he is the most powerful man in egypt, and, technically, he can do whatever he wants without any apparent oversight. that's why he is being called egypt's new dictator. that's why you have thousands of protests taking place behind us in tahrir square. the protesters represent the opposing factions
's tahrir square and elsewhere in egypt today, sparked when president mohamed morsi granted himself broad new powers. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the widespread demonstrations, and assess what's behind the egyptian leader's moves. >> brown: then, the death toll in syria's 20-month war has climbed past 40,000, according to a human rights group. we get an update from margaret warner, reporting from the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we close with poet jennifer fitzgerald on hurricane sandy's destructive path through her home town of staten
it in the fascinating relationship between president obama and mohammed morsi. two mag ma tist pragmatists trya way to mediate this. you see it in the backdrop of surprising riots in jordan which will cause increasing problems, you have that changing environment which you know far more about. but the arab street needs something different. these governments now need to be more responsive to their people so that is an opening for a different relationship. and the president, no american president is going to criticize israel's launching of this war. but this is an opening for a relationship with egypt, with turkey, to implement a cease-fire that will monitor arms smuggling into gaza. that will monitor israel's relationship. overarching all of it, such a painful issue to discuss. overarching -- all of it is a history. going back at least to '67. of the united states' role, maybe, the united states' role as the enabler. as the political diplomatic economic military enabler of an israeli policy. in many ways, a younger generation is seeing israelis, that is not in the long-term benefit of the security of
with palestinian president mahmoud abbas and she is set to sit down with egyptian president mohamed morsi. >>> no claim of responsibility on that bus explosion yet but word is that hamas has blessed the attacks. we go to ben wedeman for more on that. >> reporter: what we heard from a nearby mosque is an announcement saying that, quote, unquote, lions from the west bank had carried out that attack in tel aviv. there was also the suggestion in that announcement from the mosque that hamas was somehow responsible for that attack. however, the television affiliated with the hamas movement said yes, they did bless that attack but said it was a, quote, unquote, natural reaction to israel's offensive against the gaza strip. so, there has been no claim of responsibility by hamas or by anybody else at this point regarding that attack. now there was some scattered celebratory gunfire in gaza after news of the attack in tel aviv. i'm not aware of anybody handing out candy. it's important to stress that not everybody supports hamas in the gaza strip. and there are many people who are unhappy with the
think they're pretty close right now. i know that the egyptian president, mohamed morsi, very much involved. he's got good relations with hamas, israelis have a relationship, i don't know how good it is, but they have a relationship with the egyptians. there have been israeli envoys that have gone to cairo to meet with high-ranking egyptian officials. trying to broker a deal. no trust, hamas has to trust for the israelis and israelis have no trust for the hamas. there have been a lot of rockets and missiles coming from gaza into israeli and the israeli air strikes pounded away at targets in garz. a lot of casualties. there's no goodwill on the part of either of these, they don't trust each other. having said that, looks like they're close. hamas seems to think within the next hour or two some agreement will be announced, thanks to the egyptians. but i spoke with the israeli government spokesman for the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu in the past hour, he said there's no deal yet. he didn't rule out there wouldn't be a deal but he said there's no deal yet. until all of the
big question marks about egypt's new president. mohammed morsi, a long time member of the muslim brotherhood here in egypt and openly sympathetic to hamas which, of course, the u.s. considers a terrorist organization. and, yet, right now he is receiving high praise from u.s. officials for his mediation of this conflict. here is what secretary of state hillary clinton had to say. this is a critical moment for the region. government is assuming the responsibility and leadership that has long made this country a corner stone of regional stability and peace. notoriously fragile after eight dayings of fighting. the next 24 hours will be closely watched to see whether this truce has a chance. trace? >> steve harrigan live in what is now early morning live in cairo, egypt. the white house says president obama called israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu and egyptian president mohammed morsi today. the president thanked them for working out a cease-fire deal but also said it's important to keep working on a more durable solution. a live update from the white house coming up on "the f
mohamed morsy has announced sweeping new power for himself, ordering egyptian courts not to overturn a decree now issued since he took office. as the crowd gathers there is a growing sense of unease over what may happen next. now, from cairo. >> reporter: demonstrations continue against the egyptian president, mohamed morsy, not the big numbers we saw on friday. but certainly, still a lot of people out here, about 30 tents here, this is an indication that many of these protesters want to be here for a while. it is not clear how long they will stay here. but when you talk to them they seem determined to speak out against mr. morsy's controversial decrees. he is saying that nobody can revise what i say. he is actually throwing the whole system out, totally. >> reporter: meanwhile, big developments in meeting rooms and news conferences, where factions opposed mr. morsy's moves to put pressure on the system. it seemed to weaken the judiciary, by calling for a nationwide judge's strike. also the supreme judicial committee, discussed the attack on the judiciary. they called for a one-milli
are spending the night in tahrir square. they are demonstrating against president mohamed morsi's controversial decree granting himself unchecked political power. earlier today, protesters threw rocks at police who responded with tear gas. we'll have much more on this story at the bottom of the hour. >>> an emergency at the u.s. state department today, fire trucks raced to the department headquarters in washington shortly before noon. a flash fire in the duct work of the building forced everyone to evacuate and sent three people to the hospital, one in serious condition. construction workers were among the few people in that building because it is a holiday weekend. >>> investigators are still trying to figure out the source of a gas explosion that damaged more than 40 buildings in springfield, massachusetts, last night. a wwlp camera captured the moment of the blast. 18 people were injured, mostly emergency workers. they had been called to the scene because of reports of a gas smell. they had evacuated some of the area about an hour before that explosion. >>> superstorm sandy has now cost new
, egypt newly elected president mohammed morsi granted himself sweeping powellers to give him oversight of any kind and says it's necessary to push through much-needed reforms but they responded with violent protests. this is something that is controversial. people say we have opineed the arab spring but the democracy is thrown aside. >> eric: mohammed morsi before the peace treaty or the cease-fire they came to agree on, before it seemed like he was going to side with hamas, with the palestinians. somehow he came through and came through, first of all, the most important thing he did is declared that the egypt israeli peace treaty or treaty in effect and strong. that really told the world that egypt is going to continue to be a good ally. he is getting pushback from his people because he declared himself the czar or pharaoh or whatever once in power. but for me, egypt is the most important piece of the pozle in the middle east -- pozle in the middle east. >> dana: this really saddened me. people in egypt, those who participated in the arab spring fought for self-determination. they wan
of cairo. demonstrators are angry over president mohammed morsi's decision to increase his power. morsi stripped powers from judges to overturn any of his decrees. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo this morning. we had hopeful seen the protests in the capital. are they spreading now? >> reporter: it looks like it, ramdi. a number of protesters trying to attack the offices of the muslim brotherhood. that's when they say the muslim brotherhood fought them back, and that's when you had clashes between the two sides. a number of people injured and arrested there. also, reports of demonstrations south of cairo, but the heart of these demonstrations continues to be here, tahrir square. we're going to give you a live look of what things look like right now. a few thousand people there. many of chem with their tents pitched. these are people who represent the liberal factions, the youth rights, the women's rights groups, the secularists here, and when you talk to them, they say they're determined to stay here until mr. morsi, the president, heeds their call. they're the peaceful protesters. at times
mohamed morsi's move late last week granting really extraordinary powers. critics have called it an undemocratic power grab. today morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has denounced his action. we're going to go now to matthew chance who is in london. good morning, matthew. i want to start with the news that really just happened. israel's defense minister ehud barak finishing up a press conference, announcing that he is resigning come january. any sense of whythis move is happening, and what next for ehud barak? he's really been a central key figure in israel for decades. >> yes, he certainly has. i don't think there's a great deal of surprise in this announcement. certainly within israel and the political circles that i've been speaking to, at least. it's something that mr. barak says that he wants to do for a long time but the recent operation by israeli forces in gaza delayed his announcement to do that. something he says he's been planning to do for a long time. this is a figure, as you mention, who's been in public office and public service for his entire
to be with you. i'm terrell brown. we begin in egypt. president mohamed morsi is scheduled to meet with senior judges today to discuss his move to assume absolute authority. morsi's power grab has triggered three days of violent protests, injuring hundreds. yesterday the egyptian stock market was down more than 9.5%. some u.s. lawmakers are urging caution in dealing with egypt's new islamic leader. >> we don't obviously want to see a democratically elected autocrat take the place of an undemocratically elected dictator. which was the case before that. >> holly williams is in cairo this morning. what's the latest there now? >> reporter: good morning, terrell. here in egypt we saw a lot more violence yesterday. in cairo, protesters who were angry with president morsi fought running street battles with the police. protesters throwing rocks, police firing back with tear gas. one person was killed when a crowd attacked the headquarters of the muslim brotherhood, the islamist group from which the president draws much of his support. beyond the violence you get the sense the president's opponents don
, egyptian president mohamed morsi is expected to explain why he granted himself almost absolute authority in a national address later today. anti-morsi protests raged through the night just down the road from where the egyptian assembly agreed on a final constitution. a vote is expected today. holly williams is in cairo. >> reporter: what we're seeing here in egypt is a straight on -- 0 show down between mohamed morsi the country's first democratically elected president and his opponent. morsi is showing no signs of backing down from the expanded new powers that he gave himself last week including immunity from the court. judges from these top courts have gone on strike. meanwhile egypt's supreme constitutional court said it will rule on sunday on whether or not to dissolve the assembly that drafted egypt's new constitution. that assembly is dominated by morsi's allies. they are rushing to finish a final draft. on tahrir square in central cairo some opponents are camped out and say they won't leave until he relinquishes his new powers. president morsi supporters are planning a demonstrati
egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look at cairo today, it doesn't seem like it. the demonstrations are continuing. so are clashes. about an hour and a half ago clashes taking place right where we are behind us at the hotel we're staying at. security forces clashing with protesters. a number of protesters ambushed a police vehicle carrying riot police. the police took off. the protesters got ahold of this truck, set it on fire. more security forces came in, shot tear gas and disbursed the protesters. we've seen similar clashes throughout the day. all the demonstrators angry after president morsi declared some controversial decrees that temporaril
. you have, if you will, the new egypt represented by mohamed morsi and the islamists and muslim brotherhood against, versus the old egypt in the court system, people appointed by a mubarak and the issue of course as you know is will there be a constitutional assembly that will proceed with a new constitution, will that proceed or will the court strike it down. i think the islamists have the advantage right now. morsi does because he has tremendous public support from his movement, and there will be dueling demonstrations on tuesday. i would expect the muslim brotherhood dominated that demonstration to be the larger one. >> the other question is what account u.s. do, what should the u.s. do? >> this is going to be a difficult balancing act for the obama administration because, of course, the united states must support the continuation of democracy especially in egypt which is the heart of the arab world. and so i think you'll see some criticism by the state department and white house where president morsi has announced but on the other hand you saw last week how important morsi w
and you can see quite -- have gathered and you can see quite a crowd out there after mohamed morsi -- president mohamed morsi planned on meeting with council and they plan a big protest tomorrow. >>> a factory fire killed at least 112 people. angry workers blocked a major highway. the fire that broke out trapped the workers inside and at least 12 people died after jumping from the building to escape the flames. >>> massachusetts investigators know what caused the massive explosion that destroyed 42 buildings. the state fire marshall said a utility worker punctured a high pressure line and the exposure was then ignite by a spark. they followed sidewalk markings to a gas leak but the markings were wrong. 21 people were injured. >>> the search is ended for a 16-year-old boy. it happened at big lagoon. the teen and his parents went out into the water trying to save their dog. both parents drowned and they were pronounced dead at the scene. the coast guard has called off the search for the teenage boy and the dog by the way survived. >>> and gun violence, shot and killed after 24 hours
mohammed morsi and the chief judiciary council so there could be a opportunity for one side to step back from the precipice which is growing loud and dangerous here in cairo. >> shannon: thank you. >> we think mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire, which is fragile, but this is not acceptable. this is not what the united states of america taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy, which you promised the people of egypt when your party and you were elected president. >> that was senator john mccain saying while the egyptian president's efforts in the israeli palestinian conflict are to be applauded, it's time for president obama to condemn him. early today i sat down with chris wallace for the inside scoop on his interview with the senator. >> as things heat up you had senator john mccain with you today to talk about mohammed morsi power grab. >> he's concerned. does the old saying it's not the first election, it's the second election. once people get into power, do they continue the democratic system or grab all the power. h
said president mohamed morsi. clearly he felt that his position was greatly strengthened by brokering this peace deal between israel and hamas in gaza. but i think he's overplayed his hand. you just showed that video of the protests there in cairo. we'll have to see where this goes. the great fear is that the muslim brotherhood, like other fascist organizations, will be one man, one vote, one time. and we've seen the muslim blo brotherhood move very swift tloi consolidate their power. >> the u.s. stood squarely behind israel throughout this conflict. does that quiet any critics who thought president obama was soft on israeli security? >> i think it absolutely should. what we saw even before the election here in the united states is that netanyahu has said time and again even in the face of critics that there has been no stronger ally to israel than the united states. the criticism kept comincoming, though. after this incident, i really do think the critics will be quieted. there's a lot of talk about how successful the iron dome program wus was. it deflected over 80% of the rockets th
, opponents set fire to the offices of president mohammed morsi's political party, the muslim brotherhood. there and elsewhere in egypt today, the president's critics and supporters clashed in the streets over his decree yesterday exempting himself from judicial review, and giving him authority to take steps against "threats to the revolution." morsi, egypt's first freely elected president, took office in june. in recent days, he'd garnered worldwide praise for mediating a cease-fire between israel and hamas. today, he told a supportive crowd outside the presidential palace in cairo that granting himself sweeping powers was necessary to prevent figures from the old regime from halting progress. >> ( translated ): i haven't taken a decision to use it against anyone-- to go against anyone is something that i could never be associated with-- or announcing that i am biased towards anyone. however, i must put myself on a clear path that will lead to the achievement of a clear goal. >> brown: the president's backers insisted the decree would be in effect only until a new constitution is approve
to breaking news out of cairo, egypt. protesters are outraged at egyptian president mohamed morsi's power grab. thousands have gathered calling it the birth of a new pharaoh. attacking the headquarters of morsi's political party in alexandria and set it on fire according to egyptian tv. reza sayah joins us on the phone from tarir square. set the scene for us. reza, are you there? >> reporter: hello? >> reza, can you hear me? >> reporter: carol, i apologize. it is very loud here. i'm going to have a terribly difficult time hearing you. we are at tahrir square where thousands of people have come to protest against egyptian president mohamed morsi and there appears to be clashes between security forces and protest protesters in tahrir square. we just saw hundreds of people run i running away from security forces. we can report that tear gas has been shot in the air, we're assuming by security forces. it's remarkable here, carol, we're hear iing what we heard t years ago during revolution that toppled president mubarak, that people want to topple the regime. you're hearing it again, the anger and
. mohamed morsi under fire for granting himself extraordinary powers. will that affect cease-fire talks between israel and hamas? they're happening in egypt today. >> and $59 billion! retail records broken as americans crowded stores for some competitive shopping over the weekend. and now cyber monday is here. will shoppers be in even more of a spending mood? >> you want to talk about money? a new powerball jackpot. a new record in the cash payout. it's unreal. >> a packed two hours ahead for you this morning. new jersey congressman bill pascrell will be joining us, grover norquist, jamie rubin, dr. hanan ashrawi, will be our guest, peter billingsley from a christmas story, and grinle college hoops star jack taylor. remember him? big game he had the other day. and the one and only tony bennett, monday, november 26th. welcome, everybody, "starting point" this morning. is that a hint of compromise in the air on capitol hill? 35 days left till we reach the fiscal cliff. and a couple of key republicans are now suggesting that they're willing to forego their no tax pledge to try to get a bud
the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judiciary by banning anyone -- any authority, even the judiciary, from questioning, appealing any decisions he made since june. the question was going into this meeting, would he scale back on some of those d
to accept these actions and bloodshed. and is -- >> egyptian president mohamed morsi spoke on egyptian television. mohammed omer -- mohamed morsi apparently pulling out the egyptian ambassador to israel, mohammed omer, where do you see this going right now? and talk about four years ago. it was about, what, a month from now four years ago, right after president obama was elected for the first time before he was inaugurated that operation cast led happen that killed more than 1000 palestinians? what do you see happening now? >> well, it brings back for many gazans the past led operation. many think, this is cast led 2. you can see it in the streets free of you walking the streets, people are rushing into the shops buying food. the gas stations, if not into, are very crowded with people trying to get as much fuel to run their electricity. as we speak right now, i do not have electricity so we have to rely on a generator in order to work. i see this situation -- it is not going to be sought any time soon. the egyptians will have to find another palestinian for whom they can talk to. i rea
mohamed morsi played in actually trying to broker this makes all of the logic in the world that we should be trying to foster communication between all of the sides and not ignore one party over the other. >> diana, how challenging is it for hamas to put under its tent, under its umbrella, if you will, splinter groups, offshoots, factions that they necessarily don't have control over? is that where a lot of the problem lies? >> no. the problem largely lies in the fact that there have been competing strategies in terms of how to address israel's occupation. on the one hand abbas said we are only going to pursue negotiations and we've seen those have failed and other sides who have said that clearly the negotiations aren't working. clearly the negotiations have failed and, therefore, we have to pursue another strategy of defending ourselves. now in order for this to move forward, for us as palestinians to be able to move forward and to get this, to actually begin to hold israel accountable, there has to be a unified strategy and all palestinians have come forward and said that they want to
, cbs news, new york. >> turning overseas, the struggle over egyptian president mohammed morsi expanded powers ratcheted up another notch today, a panel of top judges denounced the move as an unprecedented assault on the judiciary, joining a wave of protests that includes top opposition leaders as well as demonstrators on the street. >> holly williams joins us now from cairo with the latest. >> chip, here in central cairo we are seeing protesters angry with morsi and throwing stones at the police and are firing back with tear gas canisters, and earlier today one prominent opposition figure, mohammed al faridi accused the president of giving himself the powers of a pharoe a ah. >> the protests were smaller than yesterday. >> those who believe president morsi made a brazen power grab clashed with the authorities. >> but many here who support president morsi's expanded role. >> a spokesperson for his freedom and justice party, she says the new measure that is temporary and not anti-democratic, because mr. morsi wants 52 percent of the vote in the, won 52 percent of the presidential electio
today. martha: egyptian president mohammed morsi predicting and in the fighting between israel and gaza strip a perhaps within hours. you would not know it hearing the sirens blaring this hour. there is a scheduled arrival of secretary hillary clinton. this is now we start a brand-new "america's newsroom." i'm martha maccallum. bill: i'm bill hemmer. so far no evidence of that claim by president morsi. secretary clinton left a meeting with president obama. her first stop will be a meeting with prime minister benjamin netanyahu. martha: steven hayes, good morning to you, what do you expect to khreup hillary clinton's visit? >> i think it's an important visit. right now israel needs the united states to be a strong advocate and ally. if you look forward and look at the landscape that is facing israel, particularly over the next year, both in the short term fighting with hamas and then in the long term when you look at potential unrest in syria, in iran, in the region generally, i think this. during this fight the united states needs to signal that we are going to be with israel and going
moment for mohammed morsi. a couple of years ago he was part of the outlawed muslim brotherhood. president obama, and not only that, but netanyahu have talked about the key egyptian rule and president morsi's role in this. the only other wild-card going forward is the iranian backers, specifically islamic jihad inside gaza. hamas does not control all of them, and there is a reasonable chance that iran will put pressure on those groups to break the cease-fire would try to put it on tender hooks for a while to flex their muscles with the israelis. megyn: leland vittert live with breaking news. we will be back with breaking news as the show progresses. in the past 24 hours, hillary clinton met with the palestinian president and the egyptian egyptian leadership who has been mediating between israel and hamas. ahead, we will take a closer look at the role of the cease-fire talks and where this could go from here and what happens if it is not honored and it falls apart. monica crowley joins me live coming up next. important at the numbers in the economic realm. drought fueled by uncer
but egyptian president mohamed morsi has deep connection with hamas and it suggests they must take responsibility if the cease-fire is broken. >>> u.s. president barack obama welcomed the truce. he told netanyahu the u.s. would use the opportunity to accept israel address its security needs, including the smuggling of weapons and explosives into gaza. obama also spoke with president morsi and thanked him for his leadership in the negotiations. they agreed on the importance of working toward a more durable solution to the situation in gaza. >>> greek leaders are wringing their hands as they wait to find out whether they'll get loans they need to cover their expenses. ai uchida joins us from the business team. the greeks seem to face one drama afr another, what now? >> all they can do at the moment is wait for the next act to begin. decisions keep getting postponed so the prime minister of greece strongly urged the early provision of additional bailout. the appeal was made after eurozone finance ministers failed again to reach a deal. finance ministers from the 17 eurozone countries
us live now. good morning to you. >> good morning, lynn. it's a critical day for mohamed morsi, a former leader of the muslim brotherhood which began on thursday when he issued the decree putting all his decisions effectively above the law. he said he was doing that to protect egypt's very slow move towards democracy from the judges and prosecutors mostly hand picked by hosni mubarak who were seen as sabotaging the process. the backlash was huge, was immediate, the past four days with national strikes, a sit-in on tahrir square and on going clashes between pro morsi and anti--morsi camps and the riot police. so far neither side has backed down. the pressures are growing. egypt's stock market, after losing $5 billion yesterday, has dropped another 5% today. all eyes now are on this meeting between top judges and morsi who it's hoped we'll find some kind of face-saving end to a crisis splitting egypt apart just when it should be sitting down, unified, and working on things like a new constitution. lynn, if there's any reminder of how all this might play out, there's a funeral lat
. in egypt, president mohammed morsi is expected to approve a new constitution passed by the assembly as early as saturday. that may mean an end to the protests against morsi's decree giving himself new powers. >>> former president george h.w. bush is expected to leave a houston hospital by the weekend. the 88-year-old was treated for bronchitis and a lingering cough. >>> private bradley manning spoke at a hearing on charges he faces for leaking secrets to wikileaks. he told a military judge he was kept in solitary confinement and only allowed 20 minutes outdoors per day. >>> supreme court justice is meeting behind closed doors regarding same-sex marriage. they're expected to take up at least one of them, most likely a challenge to the defense of marriage act which defines a marriage as a union between one man and with mon. >>> joe biden went shopping and tasted food and bought children's books, a big screen tv and an apple pie. >>> >>> a the new list of the most popular baby names for 2012 is just out. top names for boys, aiden, jackson, ethan, liam, and mason. and top names for girl
of this year. this was a rally mohammed morsi was at. i wanted to play for you what it said. [ speaking foreign language ] >> again, that was a rally for mohammed morsi. and he was saying that the united states of the arabs will be restored by this man. the capital of the united states of the arabs will be restored by this man. come on you lovers of martyr dom. do you trust morsi? >> we focus on deeds rather than words an egypt has filled a constructive role in the past and we hope egypt will continue to fill that role. >> do you think this could if you do have a deal, lead to a real working relationship with the morsi government, where the treaty isn't in jeopardy, or do you think that is something way too pie in the sky? >> we're always welcoming of an improvement with egypt. we've had a peace treaty for 34 years. that is essential for us, but no less crucial for the egyptians. we all need stability and particularly, egypt now, needs that stability and we have every reason to believe that interest will continue. >> thanks as always for your time. >> thank you. >> we have new information on th
president mohamed morsi. he is caught on the horns of a dilemma. he's caught between his own public opinion which is very, very an tag nasic to israel and the leads of diplomacy and the needs of the ties to the americans. so he's trying to do it as best he can. he made this remark when he said hey, look, egypt of today is not the egypt of yesterday. the arab world of today is not the arab world of yesterday. but i think there are some real limits as well on the egyptians. one thing that we have to say since we're really beginning to talk about diplomacy, our president is in, i think, now in cambod cambodia. he has with him his secretary of state and his national security advi adviser. it's a remarkable development. when you ask, what is the role of the united states in this crisis, you are always told oh, they're on the phone. so it is phone diplomacy for the united states, and that's about all. >> reporter: ann marie slaughter, do you agree with that? should the u.s. be doing more here? >> well, at this point, it's not really clear what the u.s. can be doing because although the egyptians
where america's allegiance is. test for mohammed morsi in egypt. a test for the turks. the turkish prime minister came out and said israel is terrorist group, not hamas. so they are feeling this out. in my opinion, they are feeling out what would happen if it were israeli-iran and i think it's -- we should be concerned here. the middle east is not siding with the right sides now. >> dana: what about that, bob, when the turkish prime minister says that israel is the terrorist state? does that surprise you? >> bob: it doesn't surprise me because turkey is having a massive internal conflict between muslims and the secular community and the muslim community. but they still have the most stable and necessary of all countries in the area. it would be necessary to have it work. one of the things -- i want to give netanyahu some credit here for showing some restraint. you mentioned this yesterday and i think in the face of this, they have shown a lot of restraint. one thing they need to do is what the gazans want to get the blockade lifted on the sea ports. israel is in control of them. i think
islamist president, mohamed morsi and his government, who made this happen. >> christiane amanpour, thank you very much indeed. >>> coming next, rudy giuliani has more on the cease-fire and if it will hold. iversity of pho we're working with a growing list of almost two thousand corporate partners - companies like microsoft, american red cross and adobe - to create options for you. not only that, we're using what we learn from these partners to shape our curriculum. so that when you find the job you want you'll be a perfect fit. let's get to work. aya . >>> i would like especially to thank president obama for his unreserved support for israel's actions in the operation, and for israel's right to defend itself, as well as support for the iron dome systems. >> israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu thanking president obama for standing by israel's side during the fighting. but did the white house handle the crisis effectively. joining me now, former new york mayor and presidential candidate, rudy giuliani joining me, welcome. >> how are you piers? >> i want to read you a tweet from a mut
president mohammed morsi in a few light. no matter how the truce plays out, his reputation has been enhanced. paula newton looks at the winners and losers in this conflict. >> reporter: however crude the calculation, especially amid the civilian casualties, there are winners and losers in this truce, and they are already reshaping political alliances in the region. we begin in egypt and president mohammed morsi clearly underestimated his handling of what a mine field of competing interests has given him much needed political capital in both the arab world and the united states. >> puts a civilian president in egypt perceived as a weak leader has much, to everyone's surprise, delivered. >> reporter: then there's israel and its tenacious prime minister benjamin netanyahu. after israel targeted and killed hamas's military leader, he launched air strikes hitting more than 1,500 targets in gaza, dismantling some of hamas's arsenal of weapons. israel had a successful combat debut of iron dome. u.s.-funded defense shield that kept dozens of rockets from hitting israeli civilians. the counter point
and more clashes over legal order announced by egyptian president mohammed morsy. we'll tell why you morsy's supporters are calling for a million man demonstration. >>> and a maryland law vofrg the collection of dan evidence goes before the u.s. supreme court in february. it could impact the entire country in many ways. our legal guys are weighing in. and u.s. companies are starting to rethink their off shore manufacturing strategy. we'll find out why one ceo decided to bring jobs back to the u.s. [ male announcer ] this is joe woods' first day of work. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great northwest. he'll start investing early, he'll find some good people to help guide him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ gordon ] for some this line is a convenience. how you doing today? i'm good thanks.
and that's when you had clashes between the muslim brotherhood and their supporters and anti-mohamed morsi protesters. there were a number of injuries there. also reports of demonstrations in the city of as yut. i'm going to carefully step aside and have a live look at what the square looks light now. i would say a few thousand people still here and we're continuing see the clashes between the protesters and police this morning. this morning there was fire to try to disperse crowds. why this is taking place in the square, there are a number of moves and decisions being made by opposing factions to apply pressure on mr. morsi, opposie ing factions have decided to call for a 1 million-man protest and also the muslim brotherhood has called for a 1 million man protest. >> do you have a handel compares to those who are against him at this point? >> yeah. keep in mind the muslim brotherhood and president mohamed morsi have a tremendous amount of it. the muslim brotherhood have called for protests and demonstrations today. of course jourks the 1 million-man protest they've called for on tuesday.
in gaza today. a planned cease-fire for the visit never materialized while president mohamed morsi made it clear whose side egypt is on. >> translator: we support the people of gaza. we are with them in their trenches. what hurts them hurts us. and the blood that flows from their children is our blood too. >> so most of the west, including the united states sides with israel. a nation now on the brink of staging a ground assault. israel's deputy foreign minister told cnn this morning that would trigger that move. >> if we will see in the next 24, 36 hours more rockets, launched at us, i think that would be the trigger. >> ben wedeman joins me now from the israel/gaza border. what are you seeing and hearing there now? >> reporter: it is a bit surreal here. we're in the city's marina right next to the yoko sushi restaurant. as you can see, there are people out, having dinner. seemingly to be living a normal life. but the owner of this restaurant did tell us just an hour ago they heard the air raid sirens and in fact just a moment ago we saw in this screen with israeli television that in b
's in cairo and meeting with the egyptian president mohammed morsi who has emerged as a key player in the effort to try to end the fighting between israel and hamas. but mr. morsi walking a very tight political and social, for that matter, tight rope. reza sayah joining us from cairo. reza, morsi playing a pivot on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking o
to the government in egypt, the president mohamed morsi, that they would stop firing into israel. if that were to be revoked, that would be a violation. they would be breaking their word to the egyptians and that would cause some serious repercussions i assume, christiane, between the egypt government, muslim brotherhood-led government, and hamas. >> reporter: well, i was obviously talking about what's the perspective from this side was. but of course israel's demand was that there would be no more rockets and no more of that fire going into israel. that was something they really wanted. and of course israel does not want to see hamas resupplied through the tunnel network. that is still to be worked out. i asked him whether or not he got weapons and whether hamas was getting weapons from iran, and he gave me a non-confirmation confirmation. it's an open secret that they come through those tunnels. so that has to be taken in hand. we're not sure how that's going to happen, but obviously there is some egyptian role in that as well. but, yes, egypt is the guarantor of this cease-fire. neither sid
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